June

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      Odds~n~Ends

Purges, Bloodletting and the Evil Eye: The Bizarre Case Notes From ‘Quack’ Doctors in the 17th Century

From Rare Historical Photos:

The bookmobiles – Vintage photos of traveling libraries, 1910s-1960s

The Old Cincinnati Library before being demolished, 1874-1955 

Lost Weegee Crime Photos Revealed! Hiding in a junk-store box, unseen for 82 years. Historians, journalists astounded! 

The Spy Case That Made Adam Schiff a Russia Hawk

Paranoid and Madcap, The Manchurian Candidate Is Our Timeliest Novel

From the June 2019 issue of The Atlantic: Female Spies and Their Secrets  “An old-boy operation was transformed by women during World War II, and at last the unsung upstarts are getting their due.” A review of four new books on the topic.

Ten Women Mystery And Thriller Writers You Should be Reading

From The Atlantic: ‘Serial Killers Are a Uniquely American Phenomenon’ 

Long Read: Who killed the prime minister? The unsolved murder that still haunts Sweden.

Bentley’s $250,000 book is the Bentley of books

      Coupla Podcasts!

From Slate: The Queen: Linda Taylor committed abhorrent crimes. She became a legend for the least of them. A new podcast on the life of America’s original “welfare queen.”

From NPR: White Lies: In 1965, a white minister was murdered in Selma, Alabama. For more than 50 years, witnesses buried the truth about what happened.


From Chris Pavone: The morning when normal ended: A personal account of September 11

      Words for the Month

Dude: “Before there was ‘bro’, there was ‘dude’: that informal address that slaps you on the back with one hand, gives you a White Russian with the other, and says, ‘hey, I woke up at noon too, man’. For the past 20 years, Jeff Bridge’s portrayal of The Dude in the Coen Brothers’ film The Big Lebowski (1998) has epitomised the seductive spirit of dudeness. Dishevelled, stoned and disorientated, The Dude’s laid-back attitude is difficult to square with the artsy origin of the word itself, which seems to have entered popular discourse in the early 1880s as shorthand for foppishly turned-out male followers of the Aesthetic Movement – a short-lived artistic vogue that championed superficial fashion and decadent beauty (‘art for art’s sake’) and was associated with ostentatiously-attired artists such as James McNeill Whistler and Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

It’s thought that ‘dude’ is an abbreviation of ‘Doodle’ in ‘Yankee Doodle’, and probably refers to the new-fangled ‘dandy’ that the song describes. Originally sung in the late 18th Century by British soldiers keen to lampoon the American colonists with whom they were at war, the ditty, by the end of the 19th Century, had been embraced in the US as a patriotic anthem.

By then, an indigenous species of fastidiously over-styled popinjays had emerged in America to rival the British dandy, and it is to this new breed of primly dressed aesthetes that the term ‘dude’ was attached. Over time, the silk cravats and tapered trousers, varnished shoes and stripy vests worn by such proponents of the trend as Evander Berry Wall (the New York City socialite who was dubbed ‘King of the Dudes’) would be stripped away, leaving little more than a countercultural attitude to define what it means to be a Dude (or an El Duderino, if you’re not into the whole brevity thing).”

thanks to the bbc

      Author Events

June 3: Owen Laukkanen, Third Place/LFP, 7pm

June 5: Sujata Massey, University Books/Mill Creek, 7pm

June 6: Meg Tilly, Village Books, 7pm

June 6: Leslie Budewitz, Third Place/LFP, 7:pm

June 7: Cara Black, Third Place/LFP, 7pm

June 12: Thom Hartmann, Powell’s, 7:30pm

June 18: James Ellroy, Powell’s, 7:30pm

June 19: James Ellroy, Seattle Town Hall, 7:30   [ Ellroy is getting lost of coverage these days: James Ellroy: ‘I’ve been canonised. And that’s a gas’and James Ellroy thinks he’s a moralist – do you agree?]

June 23: Thom Hartmann, Seattle Town Hall, 7:30pm

      Words for the Month

gavel (n): A “small mallet used by presiding officers at meetings,” 1805, American English, of unknown origin; perhaps connected with German dialectal gaffel “brotherhood, friendly society,” from Middle High German gaffel “society, guild,” related to Old English gafol “tribute,” giefan “to give” (from Proto-Indo-European root *ghabh “to give or receive”). But in some sources gavel also is identified as a type of mason’s tool, in which case the extended meaning may be via freemasonry. As a verb, by 1887, from the noun. Old English had tabule “wooden hammer struck as a signal for assembly among monks,” an extended sense of table (n.). [thanks to etymonline]

      Links

April 30: Final chapter for a Mar Vista bookstore — and its unique community

April 30: Spying whales and other undercover animals

May 1: How The SF Chronicle decides which books to review

May 1: Graves of British couple murdered in Guatemala in 1978 found

May 2: ‘You are loved’ – the power of an anonymous note and gift

May 3: The Troubling Obsession with the “Sexy Psychopath”

May 3: Matthew McGough on how an LAPD officer hid a murder for nearly 30 years

May 3: Seven simple ways to boost your creativity

May 4: New details of Harper Lee true crime book revealed as briefcase mystery solved

May 4: With its second generation taking ownership this year, Carmichael’s Bookstore in Louisville keeps the past in mind as it heads into the future.

May 4: The working poor in the Hamptons: I cleaned a rich author’s swimming pool while writing my own novel

May 5: Beyond the Thirty-Nine Steps: A Life of John Buchan review – a man of no mystery

May 7: Dickens novel that joined Captain Scott on doomed expedition goes on display

May 7: 30-year-old murder of a hiker is yet another case solved due to a Genealogy Site

May 8: ‘Furious Hours’ Tells The Tale Of Harper Lee And Her Unfinished Work

May 8: A Night at James Bond’s Favorite London Martini Bar

May 9: Publisher David Godine to step down from his namesake publishing house

May 10: The real experiments that inspired Frankenstein

May 11: Did Ernest Hemingway copy his friend’s ideas for Cuban classics?

May 11: Anna Sorokin: Why do con artists and fraudsters fascinate us?

May 11: The children’s bookshop selling diversity

May 11: Brazil National Museum: ‘Little surprises’ salvaged from the ashes

May 14: Crossbow German deaths

May 15: Classic Ferrari worth millions stolen on test drive

May 16: Couple goes fishing, catches burglars’ bag containing guns and sorority pins stolen 26 years ago

May 16: From Agatha Christie to Gillian Flynn: Women mystery writers list 50 great thrillers by women

May 16: 10 Must-Refer to Spots for Mystery Fans

May 16: French doctor charged with poisoning 17 patients

May 17: How the FBI Cracked the GozNym Malware Case

May 18: Lost volume sheds new light on Tolkien’s devotion to Chaucer

May 20: Who said indie bookstores are dying? Not in the Bay Area, thank you

May 20: Why the New York Public Library Has 7 Floors of Stacks With No Books

May 21: Patrick Marks’ eco-conscious bookstore celebrates a decade of greening books

May 21: New Coke Was a Debacle. It’s Coming Back. Blame ‘Stranger Things.’

May 22: How the CIA tried to train cats to spy on the Russians: the strange, true story of Acoustic Kitty

May 24: How the stories of Jack the Ripper’s victims are finally being told

May 25: By Her Own Hand showcases rare books and manuscripts by women

May 26: Hannibal Lecter author Thomas Harris: ‘I don’t think I’ve ever made up anything’

May 27: Can Reading Fiction Really Improve Your Mental Health?

May 27: Quarry to be drained in 40 year police hunt

May 28: $42,000 worth of comic books stolen in smash-and-grab from Denver store

May 30: Cartoon scavenger hunts brighten Portland

      R.I.P.

May 11: Alvin Sargent, Spider-Man screenwriter, dies at 92

May 12: Peggy Lipton, star of “The Mod Squad”, dead at 72

May 13: Doris Day, Hollywood actress and singer, dies aged 97

May 14: Legendary comic Tim Conway dead at 85

May 17: Herman Wouk, Best-Selling Novelist With a Realist’s Touch, Dies at 103

May 24: Navajo Code Talker, New Mexico Sen. John Pinto has died at 94

      Words of the Month

gawk (v.): “stare stupidly,” 1785, American English, of uncertain origin. Perhaps [Watkins] from gaw, a survival from Middle English gowen “to stare” (c. 1200), from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse ga “to heed,” from Proto-Germanic *gawon, from Proto-Indo-European *ghow-e- “to honor, revere, worship” (see favor (n.)); and altered perhaps by gawk hand (see gawky). Liberman finds this untenable and writes that its history is entangled with that of gowk “cuckoo,” which is from Scandinavian, but it need not be from that word, either. Nor is French gauche (itself probably from Germanic) considered a likely source. “It is possibly another independent imitative formation with the structure g-k” (compare geek). From 1867 as a noun. Related: Gawked; gawking. (thanks to etymonline)

      What We’ve Been Doing

   Amber

Version 5Finder Of Lost Things: 

Don’t forget to check out my weekly serial blog! This week Phoebe finally figures out who exactly her mystery passenger really is! Hint: it’s not great news…

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Dim Sum Of All Fears – Vivien Chien

Okay for those of you who enjoy lighter mysteries but dislike the cute titles and themes – I suggest you remove the cover & title page of this book and read on.

Seriously.

Chien does a beautiful job of making sure the theme is the foundation her mystery is set on, but never overwhelms the narrative. By keeping her book squarely focused on the murder mystery at hand and our detective Lana Lee, Chien successfully avoided the pitfalls, which normally plague this style of writing. Because never once while I was reading did the Noodle Shop theme ever once overwhelm or distract from the case our heroine was trying to solve (BTW- I’m not sure the description of ‘noodle shop’ is accurate anyways – as I think of ramen or pho places not family style Chinese restaurants, but that’s just my opinion) .

In fact, I enjoyed reading this book so much I sat down and read it all in one go – and it’s been a very long time since I’ve done that!

What kept me riveted to the pages for an entire afternoon was Lana Lee. An imperfect woman with bills to pay, a fondness for doughnuts, a pug, who still bickers with her older sister and who’s unexpectedly good at running her family’s Chinese restaurant (much to her sister’s dismay) while her mom’s off dealing with her own mother in Taiwan.

Plus – I have a weakness for amateur detectives who are constantly told to keep their Nancy Drew impulses in check yet cannot help themselves!

I would recommend this book to anyone who’s looking for a mystery with a bit less blood and a great atmosphere!

   Fran

Because I will always be an indie bookshop supporter, lately my go-to bookstore is Page 2 Books in Burien, because it’s within walking distance of my job, and let’s face it, it’s the place Jayne Ann Krentz went to for her signings after we could no longer help her out, so it’s obviously a cool shop. And believe me, it is!

They know me there, and of my former life here, so when I went in to order a couple of books (the new Patricia Briggs, because it’s Mercy Thompson after all, and the debut Juliet Grame, because she’s the publisher at SOHO who helped us out and has been just a gem, so of course I’m supporting her debut novel), the owner’s face brightened – I can’t remember her name right this minute, but I will, and I’ll add it in – and then dropped when I said I was there to order books.

Yes, she looked sad because I was ordering books. She wanted me to be in to ask for a job. She wanted to hire me, and honestly, has wanted to for a while now.

I come with impeccable credentials, after all, and a fairly comprehensive knowledge of how the book world works. And I do have contacts, even now.

They’re moving into a bigger space (yay, them!), and could use my knowledge and help. I flashed on the idea of setting up a packing station so we could get back to doing the Krentz ship-outs the way they need to be done, and imagining bringing in authors for signings, and generally helping amp up the profile. Not bragging; I know my worth here.

But I had to say no, and not just because our household has gotten used to me having a real paycheck complete with benefits, and an 8 – 5, Monday through Friday schedule, which bookstores simply can’t do. Either part, actually.

No, it’s more than that. I miss selling books, I seriously do. JB, Amber and I have been comparing dreams we’ve had over the course of this couple of years being out of the business, and we’ve all three dreamed of being back in the life. It’s compelling, it’s addicting, and it’s so often heartbreaking.

I’m fairly adaptable, and I could handle another shop’s routines, but I don’t know that I’d be able to compromise my grading of books. Could I bring myself to sell a true collector a book I knew was a C, when SMB prided itself on having the best? NOTE: I’m not saying Page 2 Books has lesser standards – not by a long shot! Everything I’ve gotten there has been great, but until you’re on the inside, you don’t truly know, y’know? And I absolutely have been in other bookstores where SMB standards were not met!

One of the things I love about my current job with the Department of Corrections is that I don’t have to deal with money. I kinda blew out my financial give-a-damn circuits worrying about SMB’s finances, especially at the end. I don’t even have to make change, and it’s a bigger relief than you might think.

Page 2 Books is a general bookstore, and I have no idea how one goes about stocking such a critter. It was hard enough with a specialty shop; the nuances of managing salable titles for a general shop just boggle me, but these folks do a great job! Still, it’s another skill set that I’m not sure I’m ready for.

And there’s figuring out who you can order from, how long it’ll take to get something in, juggling all the variables, not to mention merchandising and publicity. Running a bookstore is more work than most people think, and it’s certainly not as glamorous as we made it look! 🙂

If I was going back into the book world, it would be at Page 2 Books. They’re good people, and we think in the same ways. I like them. They’d be a good second home.

Well, okay, I’d seriously consider working for Jenny Lawson – yes, THAT Jenny Lawson – who’s opening up a bookstore in her hometown, and I’d be strongly tempted to work at Nowhere Bookshop, but that would have the added disadvantage to me of having to move to Texas, which definitely isn’t happening.

I miss the book world, I do. And part of me will always want to go back. Maybe after I retire from the DoC, if they still want me, I’ll think about it. But for now, the hurt is still too real, and I need to keep my distance. Oh, but someday, I’d love to be back again!

   JB

I WANT ONE!

Aston Martin is selling 25 limited-edition DB5s for $3.5 million each. They come equipped with all the spy gear 007 used.

unfortunately, this is the only one I will ever be able to affordc235c206-e91e-11e5-93c8-aaeda8637a98

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Shop Small Businesses!


 

Agatha Award Winners

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This year’s Agatha Awards winners have been announced! Grats to all the winners!

Best Contemporary Novel

Mardi Gras Murder – Ellen Byron 
Beyond the Truth – Bruce Robert Coffin
Cry Wolf – Annette Dashofy
Kingdom of the Blind – Louise Penny
Trust Me – Hank Phillippi Ryan

Best Historical Novel

Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding – Rhys Bowen
The Gold Pawn – LA Chandlar
The Widows of Malabar Hill – Sujata Massey 
Turning the Tide – Edith Maxwell
Murder on Union Square – Victoria Thompson

Best First Novel – This year there was a tie!

A Ladies Guide to Etiquette and Murder – Dianne Freeman 
Little Comfort – Edwin Hill
What Doesn’t Kill You – Aimee Hix
Deadly Solution – Keenan Powell
Curses Boiled Again – Shari Randall 

Best Short Story – This year there was a tie!

“All God’s Sparrows” – Leslie Budewitz 
“A Postcard for the Dead” – Susanna Calkins in Florida Happens
“Bug Appetit” – Barb Goffman
“The Case of the Vanishing Professor” – Tara Laskowski 
“English 398: Fiction Workshop” – Art Taylor

Best Young Adult Mystery

Potion Problems (Just Add Magic) – Cindy Callaghan 
Winterhouse – Ben Guterson
A Side of Sabotage – C.M. Surrisi

Best Nonfiction

Mastering Plot Twists – Jane Cleland
Writing the Cozy Mystery – Nancy J Cohen
Conan Doyle for the Defense – Margalit Fox
Agatha Christie: A Mysterious Life – Laura Thompson
Wicked Women of Ohio – Jane Ann Turzillo

Need A Mother’s Day Gift Idea?

      Amber Here

Do you have a mother who enjoyed playing Lego’s with you as a kid?

Or a mom with a sense of humor, who appreciates you gifting her with a set to reminisce over – i.e. stepping on your missing brick, with bare feet, in the middle of the night?

I have just the set for you – a Pop-Up Book!

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Complete with two different stories – Little Red Riding Hood or Jack And The Bean Stalk! (Jack’s not pictured here. I like Red better.)

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Will Red save Grandma from the Wolf? Depends on the story!

(They didn’t include a Huntsman or his knife – perhaps Lego felt it was a bit to bloody?)

      Review

This is a way easy build (so long as Mom follows the instructions) by comparison to the other buildings I’ve shared with you! I finished in a hour or two watching MLS soccer a few Saturdays ago, so it shouldn’t eat up to much time out of your Mom’s day – especially if you build it together.

The final fairytale tome fits easily on a bookshelf (it’s about the size of a hefty hardback). The only downside is the Red, Grandma and the Wolf  don’t fit inside when the book is closed. So there’s a slight risk of them getting loose and straying under her foot…again.

But that will bring back fond memories of your youth and remind her how much you’ve grown and what a fine job she did raising you…Right? Definitely won’t have her cursing your name…

      P.S.

Don’t forget to check out my other blog: Finder of Lost Things!

This week Wood and Phoebe get confused by a conversational wizard!

May Newzine

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This came to our attention through a posting by Kat Richardson:

Column: Sure, you could buy that book online for $15. But here’s what that book really costs us.

It still resonates with us even though the shop has been long closed. The echoes, we assume, come from the many posts we put up about the economics of bookselling, from 2011 through 2017. Here’s where we started (scroll down to the bottom) and you can move forward clicking on the tiny arrows at the bottom of the pages.

At that time, we still hoped against hope that we could make a difference and save the shop…


Two former Amazon employees open a Seattle bookstore. The tiny new Madison Books will be powered by personal connections.

Want to save small businesses? Fix WA’s tax code

      Odds N Ends

The 2019 Thriller Award Nominations are out. Here are the nominees for all categories. The winners will be announced on July 13, 2019 at the annual convention.

From the Washington Post, a podcast about Frank Hamer, the former Texas Ranger who lead the hunt for Bonnie & Clyde. At just shy of 7 minutes, it isn’t a big commitment.

From LA: Working as a librarian gave me post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms 

You can buy advance tickets online to the bigger Spy Museum, which opens May 12 

‘Killing Eve’ asks women what they want in a crime drama — or who they want to see killed


Part spy thriller, part Game of Thrones with footnotes: A book critic reviews the Mueller report as literature.

A Book Critic’s Take on the Mueller Report


      Words for the Month

collusion (n.): “secret agreement for fraudulent or harmful purposes,” late 14th C., from Old French collusion and directly from Latin collusionem (nominative collusio) “act of colluding,” from colludere, from assimilated form of com “with, together” (see com-) + ludere “to play” (see ludicrous). “The notion of fraud or underhandedness is essential to collusion” [Fowler].

ludicrous (adj.): From the 1610s, “pertaining to play or sport” (a sense now obsolete), from Latin ludicrus “sportive” (source of Old French ludicre), from ludicrum “amusement, game, toy, source of amusement, joke,” from ludere “to play.”

This verb, along with Latin ludus “a game, play,” is from the Proto-Indo-Eurpean root *leid- or *loid “to play,” perhaps literally “to let go frequently” [de Vaan], which is the source also of Middle Irish laidid “impels;” Greek lindesthai “to contend,” lizei “plays;” Albanian lind “gives birth,” lindet “is born;” Old Lithuanian leidmi “I let,” Lithuanian leisti “to let,” laidyti “to throw,” Latvian laist “let, publish, set in motion.”

Sense of “ridiculous, apt to evoke ridicule or jest” is attested from 1782.

(thanks to etymonline.com)

      Author Events

May 4: Seanan McGuire, Third Place/LFP, 6pm

May 6: May 4: Seanan McGuire, Powells,6pm

May 7: Patricia Briggs, University Books, 7pm

May 14: Jeffery Deaver, Powell’s, 7pm

      Links of Interest

March 25: Harlan Coben on why even bestselling authors get those self-loathing writer blues

March 26: Waterstones says it can’t pay living wage, as 1,300 authors support staff appeal

March 26: The Yorkshire Ripper Files ~ a Very British Crime Story review: A strong case for why the 1970s police force failed

March 31: When America’s most famous actor went on trial for a San Francisco cop’s murder By David Curran

April 1: Justice for the Lyon Sisters ~ How a determined squad of detectives finally solved a notorious crime after 40 years

April 1: DNA Is Solving Dozens of Cold Cases. Sometimes It’s Too Late for Justice.

April 1: ‘My mission to make news less sad’

April 1: Harry Potter books burned by Polish priests alarmed by magic

April 2: What’s the new weapon against money laundering gangsters?

April 3: Malory Towers play: Why we give a fig for boarding school stories

April 3: Boy, 8, found after leaving home to ‘travel the world’

April 3: “Coffee Snobs” Who Don’t Live In Seattle…

April 4: The Cold-War Drink That Rivals Cola

April 4: Microsoft’s eBook store: When this closes, your books disappear too

April 5: Corpse found at Oregon home of missing Disney Mouseketeer

April 6: WW2 codebreaking machine reconstructed

April 9: How Accurate Is ‘The Highwaymen’? The Historical Netflix Film Doesn’t Glamorize Bonnie & Clyde

April 9: Belgian twins freed by court amid confusion over identity

April 10: Archaeological dig of early whisky distillery

April 11: Computer Analysis Says ‘Beowulf’ Is the Work of a Single Author

April 11: “Book of Lost Books Discovered in Danish Archive. The index is part of the Libro de los Epítomes, an effort by Christopher Columbus’ illegitimate son to create a searchable index of the world’s knowledge”

April 12: The Battle For SPECTRE – The Rights War That Complicated James Bond For Decades

April 12: Why is brown snow falling in the US Midwest?

April 12: Ai Weiwei unveils Lego portraits of missing Mexico students

April 12: Dozier School for Boys: Dozens more suspected graves found

April 13: Shakespeare home in London, where he wrote ‘Romeo and Juliet,’ found by historian

April 14: GCHQ cracks Frank Sidebottom’s secret codes

April 15: The Beatles in New York: Police logs detail band’s first US visit

April 15: Dog rescued 220km from Thai coast by rig workers

April 15: Crime fiction: Revisiting the tale of Lizzie Borden

April 16: Pulitzers: Capital Gazette wins for coverage of newsroom massacre

April 16: What would Florence Nightingale make of big data?

April 17: Notre-Dame fire: Booksellers urge Hunchback publishers to donate

April 17: Why I write fake online reviews’

April 17: George Lucas names Jar Jar Binks as his favorite character

April 17: Charlotte Brontë’s hair found in ring on Antiques Roadshow, say experts

April 18: Spider named after The Very Hungry Caterpillar author Eric Carle

April 18: ‘Giant lion’ fossil found in Kenya museum drawer

April 18: A tale of 2 bookstores that proves Portland isn’t going away

April 18: Poems by Daphne du Maurier Found in Photograph Frame

April 20: CIA warns Britain over Huawei spying

April 20: CIA spy Virginia Hall is about to become everyone’s next favorite historical hero

April 20: Helvetica, The Iconic Font Both Loved And Loathed, Gets Its 1st Redesign In 36 Years

April 22: Lost’ book of exquisite scientific drawings rediscovered after 190 years

April 22: The Making of the White City Devil: How H.H. Holmes Became a Serial Killer Legend

April 23: del Toro and DiCaprio will team to remake Film Noir Classic, “Nightmare Alley”

April 24: Hollywood Cops ~ On Sunset Boulevard, a lunch break isn’t much of one at all

April 25: Robert Durst’s HBO confession wasn’t what it seemed

April 25 : A Horrorshow Find: – ‘Clockwork Orange’ Follow-up Surfaces After Decades Unseen

April 25: Nora Roberts files ‘multi-plagiarism’ lawsuit alleging writer copied more than 40 authors

April 25: Australia’s Daily Telegraph prints rival’s pages by mistake

April 26: The Story of Writing in 12 Objects

April 27: 18 Bookcases That Make Us Feel All Warm And Fuzzy Inside

April 27: Denise Mina: ‘I don’t think there’s any such thing as an apolitical writer’

April 29: Fraudster poses as Jason Statham to steal victim’s money

April 29: In Classic Children’s Books, a Window to Childhood in Past Centuries

April 30: Writer Jonathan Metzl on the moment Neo-Nazis invaded his booksigning and discussion of “whiteness”

      Words for the Month

hilding (n): A mean, worthless person; a base, menial wretch. Cowardly; spiritless; base: as, a hilding fellow. (thanks to wordnik.com)

      RIP

April 1: Tania Mallet, Goldfinger actress, dies aged 77

April 5: So not exactly a mysterious but…Dan Robbins: Paint-by-numbers inventor dies 

April 9: Seymour Cassel: Character actor dies aged 84

April 10: Charles Van Doren, a Quiz Show Whiz Who Wasn’t, Dies at 93

April 16: Georgia Engel: Mary Tyler Moore Show actress dies aged 70

April 16: Warren Adler, who examined family dysfunction in ‘The War of the Roses,’ dies at 91

April 18: “James W. McCord Jr., a security expert who led a band of burglars into the shambles of the Watergate scandal and was the first to expose the White House crimes and cover-ups that precipitated the downfall of the Nixon administration in 1974, died on June 15, 2017, at his home in Douglassville, Pa. He was 93.

The death went unreported by local and national news organizations at the time. It was apparently first reported by the London-based writer and filmmaker Shane O’Sullivan in his book “Dirty Tricks: Nixon, Watergate, and the CIA,” published last year. The news of the death surfaced again on March 31 on the website Kennedys and King.”

April 21: David Picker, Studio Chief Who Acquired James Bond Novels for UA, Dies at 87

April 24: Dallas TV star Ken Kercheval dies aged 83

April 29: John Singleton: A Cinematic Gunfighter

      Words for the Month

baffoon (n): From the 1540s, “type of pantomime dance;” 1580s, “professional comic fool;” 1590s in the general sense “a clown, a joker;” from Middle French bouffon (16th C.), from Italian buffone “jester,” from buffa “joke, jest, pleasantry,” from buffare “to puff out the cheeks,” a comic gesture, of echoic origin. (thanks to etymonline.com)

      What We’ve Been Doing

   Amber

Don’t Forget to check out my blog – Finder of Lost Things!

Last week Phoebe ended up in the doghouse for trying to run up Pumpkin Mountain….This Friday she encounters morning people before her first cup of coffee!

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Death Wears A Mask & A Most Novel Revenge – Ashley Weaver

Have I told you about the Amory Ames Mysteries yet?

They are absolutely fantastic! Death Wears A Mask starts with a small, simple theft of a broach which quickly escalates into a high profile murder. A Most Novel Revenge finds Amory’s embroiled in a murder mystery rooted in another death seven years prior. A murder in retrospect you might say, a very Christie kind of plot, and yet Weaver still managed to surprise me in the end!

Both of these mysteries feature very classic English country house mystery themes, and yet Weaver still manages to breath new life into them. Weaver’s reworking of the plots accompanied by interesting details and a clever heroine all help to make these well-loved plots regain some of their luster.

But the best part of these books is the backdrop of Amory’s marriage to Milo. Unlike most duos, due to Milo’s infidelity, Amory has some serious trust issues with her partner (to the point she accused him of committing murder). However, these marital problems rather than distracting from the mystery (which is the point of the book) adds to the narrative. These problems make Amory relatable, never sounds whiny.

The unfolding of these problems and the slow evolution of Milo and Amory’s relationship help add an element of growth to these books as they are never in precisely the same spot (so far) in each story. Which helps add depth to the plot.

I would recommend this series to anyone looking for a new 1930’s historical mystery (it’s set between WWI and WWII as I’ve read so far). I cannot say how much I’ve enjoyed reading them so far and I can’t wait to get my hands on the next book!

   Fran

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“What made the Little Crocodiles different was their founder Professor Geoffrey Wheatcroft, DD, DPhil, FSW, and fully qualified wizard. The FSW is the giveaway. It stands for Fellow of the Society of the Wise, otherwise known as The Folly – the official home of British wizardry since 1775. And if this is coming as a shock you might want to consider doing some background reading before you continue.”

This is the warning Peter Grant (as written by Ben Aaronovitch in the latest of the “Rivers of London” series, Lies Sleeping, hardback only at this point) given at the beginning of his latest adventure, and he’s serious. I figured, since I’ve read the previous 6 books at least three times now, I’d be fine just jumping in.

Nope. Not even a little. So I went back, snagged Midnight Riot, and went through them all again. And, as I have from the beginning, I picked up something new in each book. Ben Aaronovitch is just that good. Believe Peter and believe me, a refresher doesn’t hurt, and the series is great anyway.

All I’m going to say plot-wise is that this book is simply jam-packed with all kinds of interesting people, including a River we haven’t met before, and you’re gonna love Foxglove. You get the feeling all the way through this is going to be the showdown between Nightingale and the Faceless Man, and there are certainly fireworks. Let’s just say that Peter’s habit of damage to the structure of London continues unabated. And there are all kinds of incredibly funny observations and asides, and I’m absolutely positive some of the pop culture references went right over my head. I’m okay with that.

It’s a must read if you’re into this series, which is wickedly intelligent, funny as hell, and a minor treatise on architecture and history that I fin fascinating. My only grump – and it’s a fairly major one – is that if I’m paying for a hardback, then I bloody well want a proofreader to have done more than smile at it. There are egregious typos in there that drove me nuts. Seriously, DAW, step up your game here!

Otherwise, start with Midnight Riot, and when you’ve finished Lies Sleeping, let’s talk. I wanna know what you think is coming next!

   JB

I should’ve been doing this all along but I don’t know that anyone else would care.

Since the shop closed, I’ve been having regular dreams about the shop. No real surprise since it was a central part of my life for nearly thirty years. I’ve often related them to Amber and Fran. Sometimes they’re about moving the shop, sometimes they’re about re-opening the shop (one was about Amber and Fran reopening it without me, and it had a grand circular staircase from the area of library tables in the basement to the sales floor – they did a very nice job on the place!), sometimes they’re in new spaces, one was that we’d decided to reopen it but 117 Cherry was no longer vacant… So it goes.

In early April I had one in which I was trying to teach two new people how to triage books for a signing. [That’s the term we borrowed from medical emergencies to mean culling through a shipment to find the hardcovers in the best condition for collectors, the copies that were fine for readers, and to see if any were damaged beyond putting out for sale.] Neither Fran or Amber were in the dream, which is why I was trying to teach it to others. I couldn’t get the guy to understand what was and was not a copy for a collector and it was so important to get it right as this was going to be a big signing, and our last, so I had to keep going back over the piles of books to find the best copies…

I’ll try to note future shop dreams. They’re always strange, vivid, and somewhat sad.


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Edgar Award Winners!

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Congrats to last night’s winner!

Best Novel

The Liar’s Girl – Catherine Ryan Howard
House Witness – Mike Lawson
A Gambler’s Jury – Victor Methos
Down the River Unto the Sea – Walter Mosley
Only to Sleep – Lawrence Osborne
A Treacherous Curse – Deanna Raybourn

Best First Novel

A Knife in the Fog – Bradley Harper
The Captives – Debra Jo Immergut
The Last Equation of Isaac Severy – Nova Jacobs
Bearskin – James A. McLaughlin
Where the Crawdads Sing – Delia Owens

Best Paperback Original

If I Die Tonight – Alison Gaylin
Hiroshima Boy – Naomi Hirahara
Under a Dark Sky – Lori Rader-Day
The Perfect Nanny – Leila Slimani
Under My Skin – Lisa Unger

Best Fact Crime

Tinderbox: The Untold Story of the Up Stairs Lounge Fire and the Rise of Gay Liberation by Robert W. Fieseler

Best Critical/Biographical

Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s by Leslie S. Klinger

Mary Higgins Clark

The Widows of Malabar Hill – Sujata Massey

The G.P. Putnam’s Sons Sue Grafton Memorial Awards

 Shell Game – Sara Paretsky

For the Full List Click Here!

Crime In Bricktown….

      Amber Here

Remember way back in December when I posted pictures of the seedier side of Lego’s “Modular Building Sets” (I dubbed it Bricktown just now as it’s easier to type)? The main attraction for SMB was the fact it had a Private Detective’s Agency on the second floor!

As it turns out there was a bit more intrigue to be found next door to the PI’s Office…

(Which of course is a separate build….)

The Brick Bank located next door to the PI’s office is getting robbed!

(Which incidentally is why my brother bought the set for me, he thought it was hilarious and the perfect compliment to my first set!)

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Here’s our Bank Robber preparing to enter the air duct which is conveniently is bereft of security features.

No one in the building suspects that a heist is happing right now! Not the staffer sitting next to the air shaft; nor the lady in the laundromat on the other side of the vault; even the bank teller is unaware of what’s happening a few short paces away!

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Our thief is positively giddy at the sight of his new found loot! All he needs to do now is make a clean get away – thru the secret passage way of the barbershop next door…

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Unfortunately our sleuth missed his opportunity to catch the thief in the act, as he was solving another puzzle (The Case of the Missing Tuna Sandwich).

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But he’ll be hot on the thief’s trail soon…

      Review

This build was perhaps a bit easier than the PI’s Office. Due to the fact you weren’t required to build so many secret nooks, exits and hidden holes. And while those made the PI’s office more difficult to build – it also made it more entertaining.

The Bank build was more straight forward. It contained a complicated aspects, such as the chandelier and the working vault door, it did grab me the same way the previous or my next build has.

(Though, to clarify it is still an Expert build – kids who are either veteran Lego build masters or kids able to follow step by step instructions without frustration or a combo of kids/older kids/adults working together to complete – should tackle this build.)

However, it does complete a great story and for that I found The Brick Bank build worth my time!

      P.S.

Don’t forget to check out my other blog: Finder Of Lost Things!

I promise it has nothing to do with Legos! And everything to do with murder.

Though in tomorrow’s episode Phoebe will enter Wood’s doghouse after a disturbing idea strikes her!