New from Greg Rucka!

From the pen of our friend Greg RuckaMV5BZTY5YTk0ZDMtODg0Zi00OGM4LTgxMTQtODAzODg2ZjE2MmM1XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTkxNjUyNQ@@._V1_

Staring Charlize Theron –

“The movie positions its team of almost sorta immortals (they can die eventually, but they tend to heal quickly from even the most surely fatal of injuries) as both avenging angels roaming the world doing justice and ancient sad sacks grown tired with their mission. Well, at least Charlize Theron’s team leader Andy (short for Andromache of Scythia) is a bit over it all, sick of the world’s ceaseless parade of horrors, one that all her butt-kicking over the millennia has done little if anything to stanch.”

 

 

Netflix’s The Old Guard Often Feels Brand-New

s-l640

 

 

“Credit to director Gina Prince-Bythewood for teasing that out, and to screenwriter Greg Rucka, adapting his own graphic novel. The Old Guard is a naked attempt to kick off a franchise, but I wasn’t bothered by all those obvious table-setting mechanics because what they’re establishing is so tantalizing.”

 

 

 

 

 

~ Trailers for the Show ~

Other writings about the graphic novel and the movie

Read this before you watch The Old Guard

The Old Guard is an action blockbuster with historical tragedy in its bones



NETFLIX – JULY 10




July 2020

ligteningjpeg

Attention: Please stop microwaving your library books.

    Cool Stuff

For you Longmire (book) fans: Pappy Van Winkle Bourbon Nib Brittle 

Mad Magazine legend Al Jaffee retires at age 99 after a record-breaking career 

Donkey released after Pakistan police swoop on gambling race 

Ancient Roman Board Game Found in Norwegian Burial Mound 

Before Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak was an incredible toy maker. 

Van Gogh’s Letter About His Brothel Visit Sells For $236,000 At Auction

Behold: your favorite movies, re-imagined as vintage book covers.

Did you know the first typewriter prototype was made with 11 piano keys?

Louisa May Alcott: Early work by Little Women author published at last 

Page Through This Incredibly Detailed Sino-Tibetan Book Printed in 1410

      Words of the Month

civil (adj). From the late 14 C., “relating to civil law or life; pertaining to the internal affairs of a state,” from Old French civil “civil, relating to civil law” (13th C.) and directly from Latin civilis “relating to a society, pertaining to public life, relating to the civic order, befitting a citizen,” hence by extension “popular, affable, courteous;” alternative adjectival derivative of civis “townsman” (see city).Meaning “not barbarous, civilized” is from 1550s. Specifically “relating to the commonwealth as secularly organized” (as opposed to military or ecclesiastical) by 1610s. Meaning “relating to the citizen in his relation to the commonwealth or to fellow citizens” also is from 1610s.

The word civil has about twelve different meanings; it is applied to all manner of objects, which are perfectly disparate. As opposed to criminal, it means all law not criminal. As opposed to ecclesiastical, it means all law not ecclesiastical: as opposed to military, it means all law not military, and so on. [John Austin, “Lectures on Jurisprudence,” 1873]

The sense of “polite” was in classical Latin, but English did not pick up this nuance of the word until late 16 C., and it has tended to descend in meaning to “meeting minimum standards of courtesy.” Courteous is thus more commonly said of superiors, civil of inferiors, since it implies or suggests the possibility of incivility or rudeness” [OED].

Civil case (as opposed to criminal) is recorded from 1610s. Civil liberty “natural liberty restrained by law only so far as is necessary for the public good” is by 1640s.            [thanks to etymonline]

      Serious Stuff

What It Feels Like to Be Shot by a Rubber Bullet 

A Conversation with a Serial Killer About the First Time He Killed a Taxi Driver


Publishers Sue Internet Archive Over Free E-Books 

The Internet Archive is ending the National Emergency Library over lawsuit from publishers.


Independent bookstore owner invests in online bookstore famous for destroying independent bookstores. [I have to add this question: she’s taking a ton of guff about being hypocritical for investing in her enemy. But why? If you can benefit from your enemy AND plow the profits off your enemy into the business they threaten, isn’t that the sweatest revenge? – JB]

Rachel Cargle Is Opening a Bookstore and Writing Center to Support Marginalized Voices 

#PublishingPaidMe reveals stark disparities between payment of white writers and writers of color. 

Over 1,000 Publishing Workers Strike to Protest Industry Racism

Olaf Palme Murder: Sweden Believes it Knows Who Killed PM in 1986

7 Times Internet Detectives Got the Wrong Guy 

They were some of California’s most brutal slave owners. Their deaths sparked a massacre.

Virginia Kellogg: The Forgotten Screenwriter Behind A String of Classic Noirs

How Women Writers Are Transforming Hardboiled Noir 

Inside Crime Novelist James Patterson’s New Jeffrey Epstein Doc


‘I pray it will finally be over’: Golden State Killer survivors hope guilty plea brings justice

Golden State Killer pleads guilty to crimes that terrorized California

An inside look at the Golden State Killer suspect’s behavior

A Startling Graph: Serial Killers By Country

Radford University/FGCU  Serial Killer Information Center

      Local Stuff

J.A. Jance: Growing Up In a Small Town, Books Opened My World

Daniel Kalla: A Thriller at the Intersection of Two Epidemics: COVID-19 and the Opioid Crisis

      Words of the Month

widdershins (adj.) From the 1510s, chiefly Scottish, originally “contrary to the course of the sun or a clock” (movement in this direction being considered unlucky), probably from Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally “against the way” (i.e. “in the opposite direction”), from widersinnen “to go against,” from wider “against” (see with) + sinnen “to travel, go,” from Old High German sinnen, related to sind “journey” (see send). [thanks to etymonline.com]

       Awards

Shortlist for the 2020 Hammett Prize has been announced. 

Behold the dark and twisted nominees for this year’s Shirley Jackson Awards.

Announcing the 2020 Dagger Awards Longlist

The shortlist for the Firecracker Awards is the perfect indie reading list. 

Bad Form Young Writers’ Prize launches with trade support

       Books and Publishing

Book World: The writer who inspired Sue Grafton – her father – gets a welcome republished mystery novel 

Will China’s entry into U.S. publishing lead to censorship? 

How this New Yorker is fighting Amazon and saving independent bookstores 

Can You Really Separate Edgar Allan Poe’s Work from His Life?

Resignations, accusations, and a board in crisis: The fallout at the National Book Critics Circle.

The National Book Critics Circle Has Imploded

By day, I’ve been trying to cull my book collection. But at night, eBay beckons.

Jefferson Davis House to Lose Literary Landmark Designation

Queer True Crime: A Reading List

Book Publishing’s Next Battle: Conservative Authors

‘It was precarious and still is’: Bookshops fight back against virus and Amazon


Authors leave literary agency over JK Rowling’s comments on transgender people 

JK Rowling: Hachette UK book staff told they are not allowed to boycott author over trans row


Bookselling in Britain ~

‘We’re back in business’: UK bookshops see sales soar 

‘It was precarious and still is’: Bookshops fight back against virus and Amazon

Britain’s wholesaler Bertram Books collapses with 450 jobs at risk


Meet Ed Vaughn, an understated Black Power icon and former bookstore owner.

Overwhelmed With Orders, Some Black-Owned Bookstores Ask for Patience

For What It’s Worth: We are often stumped about where to place a link. Some stories are Serious and Cool and Book related. Where should it be placed? For instance, the above story about Black-owned bookshops being overwhelmed with support could go in all of them. (Way to go America!) An argument could be made that most all of these Book stories could, and maybe should, go in the Serious section. Then there are the Links of Interest. Why there and not another section. The answer is: who knows. It is just a matter of where they seem to fit a the moment. We’re just the deeply flawed humans like the rest of you.

We’re not trying to downplay a story by not putting it in one place or another. We hope you’ll plow through the entire issue, clicking on things that pique your interest at first, maybe coming back to others over the month.

Lastly, as we hunt  for stories to paste in for you, please note that we often don’t get time to read them ourselves. The hunt is the goal and the pressure, and while you have time to read one issue over the course of a month, we’re already building the next issue… The fun for us is the assembly of the whole. So look it all over and have fun!

There’s no replacement for the thrill of browsing in a bookstore

      Other Forms of Entertainment

How The Asphalt Jungle Changed the Face of American Noir 

James Bond: Everything That Went Wrong With Quantum of Solace

Killing Eve’s Fiona Shaw Was “Very Disturbed” by That Moment in the Season 3 Finale 

Falling in Love with “The Rockford Files”—All Over Again 

Noir: An Antidote to Social Distancing 

John Logan, Creator of Penny Dreadful, on His New Spinoff Series, City of Angels 

Bone, Blood & Bigots: On ‘The Liberation of L.B. Jones’

Psycho at 60: the enduring power of Hitchcock’s shocking game-changer

Counting Down the Greatest Crime Films of All-Time: Continues 

“Enola Holmes”: Arthur Conan Doyle’s estate sues Netflix over film about Sherlock Holmes’ younger sister

Liz Garbus Is Taking Back the Voices Stolen by the Golden State Killer 

Learning Early From Hitchcock That Nightmares Can Be Real 

Discovering the Women Authors Behind Hitchcock’s Movies

‘Ozark’ Season 4: Netflix Renews for a Fourth and Final Season

       Words of the Month

ekphrastic: of poetry, words to describe a work of art. (thanks to Says You!, show 2101)

      RIP

May 29: Anthony James, actor in “Unforgiven,” “In the Heat of the Night”, dead at. 77

June 5: Grace Edwards, Harlem Mystery Writer, Dies at 87 

June 5: Harry Hoffman Dies at 92; Led the Expansion of Waldenbooks

June 12: Ricky Valance: First Welshman to have solo UK Number One dies

June 16: A Street Cat Named Bob: Stray who inspired series of books dies

June 19: Sir Ian Holm, star of Lord of the Rings, Alien and Chariots of Fire, dies aged 88

June 19: Carlos Ruiz Zafón, author of The Shadow of the Wind, dies aged 55

June 23: Joel Schumacher, Director of Batman Films and ‘Lost Boys,’ Dies at 80

      Author Events

ahhh… nope

      Links of Interest

June 1: I Think About This ‘Die Hard’ Villain’s Great Hair a Lot

June 1: Dick Wolf Fires ‘Law & Order’ Spin-off Writer for Violent Facebook Posts

June 1: Why Cops and Soldiers Love the Punisher

June 2: Ancient DNA offers clues to physical origins of Dead Sea Scrolls

June 3: Know your place – poetry after the Black Death reflected fear of social change

June 4: How the creator of Rizzoli & Isles went from working late-night hospital shifts in Honolulu to writing bestselling thrillers.

June 5: Remembering When Women Ruled a Wild West Town

June 8: Hidden Treasure Chest Filled With Gold And Gems Is Found In Rocky Mountains

June 8: One day, my husband disappeared. It was only the start of a larger mystery.

June 9: Meet the insidious Mr. Bucket, who embodies Dickens’ misgivings about the police force he once enthusiastically supported.

June 9: How Advertising Taught Me The Art of the Twist

June 10: Prosecutors In Sweden Finally Close Case On 1986 Assassination Of Olof Palme

June 10: Banksy artwork stolen from the Bataclan in Paris is found in Italy

June 10: Eddie Redmayne speaks out against JK Rowling’s trans tweets

June 11: The True Crime Bond

June 12: Inigo Philbrick, Dealer Behind $20 M. Art-World Scandal, Arrested by FBI

June 12: The Library-Themed Livestream Where Birds Stretch Their Wings

June 14: The people solving mysteries during lockdown

June 14: France’s ancient burial brotherhood defies Covid-19

June 16: When Crime Photography Started to See Color

June 16: The High Seas Murder That Shocked—And Baffled—The World

June 16: Diego, the Galápagos tortoise with a species-saving sex drive, retires

June 17: Emma Watson joins board Kering

June 18: In 1905, someone murdered the founder of Stanford University. They’ve never been caught.

June 19: ‘Into The Wild’ bus removed from Alaska wilderness

June 19: A History of Black Cowboys

June 22: The Uneasy Noirs of Stephen King

June 22: I Can’t Believe Readers Are Still Getting Upset Over F*cking Swearing.  In Which Amy Poeppel Uses Some Very Bad Words

June 22: Diary of a Scottish Bookseller. Shaun Bythell Recounts Life in Scotland’s Largest Used Bookstore

June 23: Amanda Peet regrets some of her career choices. Playing a murderer isn’t one of them

June 23: Confederate monument enthusiasts targeted my store—and it comically backfired.

June 23: Decades ago, Octavia Butler saw a “grim future” of climate denial and income inequality.

June 23: Loch Ness Monster debate sparked after mystery creature ‘photographed’ 

June 24: American Gods has a new annotated version with a Sherlockian twist

June 24: Segway: End of the road for the much-hyped two-wheeler

June 25: Tiny Mysteries From the Files of the New York Times (Because history is full of the small, the inexplicable, and the downright confounding….)


June 27: Me and my detective by Lee Child, Attica Locke, Sara Paretsky, Jo Nesbø and more

June 27: Lee Child on Jack Reacher: ‘I don’t like him that much’


June 28: British state ‘covered up plot to assassinate King Edward VIII’

June 28: The Motorcycle-Riding Evangelist Behind ‘Perry Mason’’s Sister Alice

June 30: I Want All of Tony Soprano’s Clothes So Bad

      Words of the Month

paup (v.) “to walk about aimlessly” (Says You!); “probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse paufa to walk slowly, walk stealthily; akin to Old English potian to push, butt, goad ” (thanks to merriam/webster)

      What We’ve Been Up To

   Ambercoming soon july jpg

IMG_0044

Josephine They – Miss Pym Disposes

What would you do if you discovered the evidence needed to convict a murderer? Would you turn it in to the authorities? Of course, you would.

But what if…

What if you didn’t care for the victim? Found them off-putting and a tad smarmy? What if by turning in your crucial piece of evidence, you are condemning someone (someone you actually do admire) at the very outset of their life to the miseries of jail? Or even the noose?

Would you turn the evidence in then?

Or do you let the Fates work it out?

Because surely, if the gods wanted the murderer punished, the police would find other evidence…Right? According to every mystery novel written (other than Christie’s Curtain), every murder makes plenty of mistakes and leaves clues for the authorities to find…

But what if you found the only one?

This is the heart of Miss Pym Disposes – what would you do?

I cannot believe I’ve waited so long to read this book! Seriously it’s been sitting on my shelf for years – and I finally picked it up – and I have to say it is one of the most unique mysteries I’ve read in a VERY long time. It’s like a cross between Christie and Austen – kinda. Like Christie, Tey leads you inexorably towards the culprit – laying down twists, turns, clues, motives, and means without even seeming too. (And in such a way my veteran mystery lover’s eyes didn’t spot them as I was reading – but are super clear after I finished). It reminds me of Jane Austen a bit – because you’re nearly done with the book before the deed is done!

Seriously if you’re looking for an interesting and largely bloodless mystery (that is in no way a cozy in the sense of the genera nowadays) I would highly suggest Ms. Pym Disposes!

Fran

Hi!

I don’t have a review, because in true 2020 fashion, my life has taken a turn for the weird, and my wife and I are moving to New Mexico.

It’s a big change, yes, but it’s a good one, and we’re mostly looking forward to it. It’s the right move.

Except, now I have to move my books.

See? It’s a problem! Because of my time at Seattle Mystery Bookshop, I have a LOT of books. And many of them are collectible first editions.

Oh sure, I’ve been culling, getting rid of the Advance Reader Copies I’ve held onto since 2004 that I have to finally face I’m never going to read. And the truly tattered copy of a mass market where I’ve got a better copy, but that tattered one was my first one and I love it.

But it’s still hard. And I keep running into treasures, and I love re-reading so I’m constantly having to force myself to stay focused. Oh, and I’m still working, so there’s that, and Lillian’s doing advance work down in New Mexico, so she’s busy too.

Still, the books are my problem. She’s got woodworking stuff to deal with when she gets back. And I’ve been faced with the problem of what to keep and what to *gulp* get rid of. Rehome.

I’ve given a lot of books to Page 2 Books in Burien, donated to help build their inventory during the plague. They became my go-to indie bookstore, and I want them to thrive. Fans of Jayne Ann Krentz will recognize the name. And I’ve also taken a lot of the ARCs to work so folks get books for free, and so far they’ve scooped up four boxes.

But you wouldn’t know it to look at my shelves. Did I mention I’ve got a LOT of books? And I’ve gotta get them safely packed soon. Like in the next two weeks soon, because we’ll be down there by August. We’re old farts and we’ll be hiring movers to haul down the heavy stuff, but I don’t trust them to pack my books! I barely trust ME, and I’m a professional! Well, you know, I was. Still am at heart, darn it.

And they’re heavy as all get-out, so that means lots and lots of boxes of books. Even paperbacks add up in weight after a while, don’t they? And oh look, I forgot I had this one; I wonder if it’s still as good as I remember…

Focus. Boxes. Dust jacket wrappers for the ones I missed. Each in a plastic bag. Well, not the paperbacks.

Oh hell, I just found my comic book stash.

So anyway, that’s why I don’t have a review this month. However, I am – now and always – a part of Seattle Mystery Bookshop, and I’m still going to be reviewing books, just from a different location.

Talk to you next month, and in the meantime, wish me luck!

 – Fran

JB

I follow the thinking of Bill Farley when it comes to Robert Goldsborogh‘s Nero Wolfe books – they’re not up to Rex Stout but it is a way to spend time with old friends.

His last few have been very nice. Sorry to say the latest9781504059886, Archie Goes Home, was a dud.

As the title says, a call from him aunt draws Archie back to his hometown to southern Ohio. His aunt – a world-class busybody – thinks something fishy with the death of the local, and loathed, banker. So, since the bank balance at the brownstone is healthy, and given the chance take the convertible on a trip to see his mother, off he goes.

The whole thing is flat. The characters aren’t very real, the plot zips along without any sense of depth, and I thought the lack of Wolfe was the problem. Well, even the arrival of Wolfe (driven by Saul) can’t spice up the book. It was dull, sorry to report.


9780399589829On the other hand, John Meacham‘s The Soul of America is must reading. Not only does the historian’s words flow with a smooth and delightful zip, he gives you seven sections that lay out periods in our country’s past when things were grim and the future of the democracy seemed dire, and how the leaders of the time rallied to pull the country and the people out of the muck. He doesn’t continually point to our sad, current state but it is clear that he’s showing us comparisons to now and telling us to not loose hope. If you’re at all interested in the grand sweep of history and how we can learn from past mistakes, pick it up. It is erudite and educational, and it will give you some faith in our “better angels.”


At the end of his last book, Joe DeMarco was driving off into the sunset. Without a job, he was just going to cruise and play golf. Sounded like a splendid retirement – for him. For me, I was horrified that a favorite series might be at an end. NOT TO FRET!

With the results of the 2018 election, Mahoney is headed back to being the Speaker of the House of Representatives and has promised to find a new, if meaningless title, for DeMarco.

Mike Lawson is an inventive writer. His ingenious plots shoot into doglegs and hook into unexpected roughs. The crash of a small plane starts House Privilege and quickly DeMarco is off to Boston and upstate NY to slice open the events and sink the villains. It’s a trap of money and heavies, and politics and power, and maybe a little bit of love for our lonely hero. He certainly deserves it, even if it requires hockey.

The only problem with a Mike Lawson book – ok, there are two – is that it is impossible to put one down once started, so it is over all too quickly. The other is that you have to wait a year for the next. Can’t wait to see where DeMarco is sent next.

9780802148476



BUY SMALL ~ SUPPORT SMALL




In Preparation of the new “Perry Mason”

“PERRY MASON” debuts on HBO Sunday, June 21st. Check your schedule for times!

“Set in 1932 Los Angeles, the series focuses on the origin story of famed defense lawyer Perry Mason, based on characters from Erle Stanley Gardner’s novels. Living check-to-check as a low-rent private investigator, Mason is haunted by his wartime experiences in France and suffering the effects of a broken marriage.”

esg-feat-726x400

Perry Mason and the Case of the Wildly Successful, Perpetually Restless Author

perry-mason-feat1

How to Write Legal Thrillers That Won’t Drive Lawyers Crazy with Mistakes and Inventions

gettyimages-151236466

An original ‘Juneteenth’ order found in the National Archives

From The Washington Post, by  Michael E. Ruane 

June 18, 2020

“The National Archives on Thursday located what appears to be an original handwritten “Juneteenth” military order informing thousands of people held in bondage in Texas they were free.

 

The decree, in the ornate handwriting of a general’s aide, was found in a formal order book stored in the Archives headquarters building in Washington. It is dated June 19, 1865, and signed by Maj. F.W. Emery, on behalf of Union Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger.

“The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, ‘all slaves are free,’ ” the order reads.

“This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor.”

The order sparked jubilation among African Americans in Texas and resulted in generations of celebration. It rings poignant today, as in recent weeks outpourings of anger against police brutality and racism have filled America’s streets.

 

It is a modest, two-paragraph entry in the book labeled “Headquarters District of Texas, Galveston … General Orders No. 3.” But it affected the lives of about 250,000 enslaved people.”

 

for the full article, and pictures of the order, see the link above.

Author Recommendations – more for the new month!

The Mysterious Bookshop in NYC has been posting lists of books recommended by (a better mix of) Big Name Authors. We’re passing them along. You can click on the links to order directly from the Mysterious Bookshop. If you’re interested in any title, please do order from a small independent bookseller!

Brendan DuBois recommends – – –

Laurie King recommends – – –

Andrew Gross recommends – – –

Lindsay Faye recommends – – –

F. Paul Wilson recommends – – –

Stephen Hunter recommends – – –

Mary Anne Kelly recommends – – –

Dennis Lehane recommends – – –

Andrew Klavan recommends – – –

Joseph Kanon recommends – – –

Susan Isaacs recommends – – –

Alafair Burke recommends – – –

June 2020

SMBJunejpeg

    Stuff That’s Just Too Cool

Odd Job’s Lethal Bowler from Goldfinger Surfaces

LeVar Burton still loves reading aloud. His storytelling might be what you need right now.

John Grisham: Why Indie Bookstores Are Essential 

A journal Jim Morrison wrote in Paris will soon be up for auction. 

The Washington Post’s virtual literary event calendar is now available. Readers can find an updated list of national bookstore, library, author events and more!

A variation on “The Dog Ate My Homework” story: Fun fact ~ John Steinbeck’s dog ate the first draft of Of Mice and Men.

    Serious Stuff

Dirty money piling up in L.A. as coronavirus cripples international money laundering

The Dark History of America’s First Female Terrorist Group 

Why it’s so hard to read a book right now, explained by a neuroscientist 

Declassified FBI Photos Show the Horror of Being a First Responder in Jonestown 

What to Make of Isaac Asimov, Sci-Fi Giant and Dirty Old Man? Despite Calling Himself a Feminist the Author of the Foundation Stories Was a Serial Harasser

A renowned scholar claimed that he discovered a first-century gospel fragment. Now he’s facing allegations of antiquities theft, cover-up, and fraud.

An Alaska School Board Will Keep Classics on the Curriculum after an Uproar over Their Removal

The World’s First ‘Incel’ Terrorism Charge

The Atlantic lays off dozens of staff members as pandemic hits media budgets

    Local Stuff

‘Starting a New Chapter: Seattle Booksellers, moved by community support amid the shutdown, say ‘indie bookstores will thrive again’

How Seattle book workers have adapted to coronavirus shutdowns — and what they’ve been reading

Starting a novel while stuck at home? Seattle author Elizabeth George shares tips in ‘Mastering the Process.’ 

What Happens to Powell’s Books When You Can’t Browse the Aisles?

    Words of the Month

bada bing (adj?): According to this interview, James Caan just improvised the words during the filming of that scene from The Godfather. Others attribute it to the rim shot produced by drummers during a comedian’s set. Others, yet, say it goes back to a skit on “The Jackie Gleason Show”, which may’ve gotten it from some earlier forgotten use in the Catskills or vaudeville. In this 1965 album, Pat Cooper says it at 14:27 into his recorded performance – it goes by very fast. Clearly, the modern use stems from The Godfather in 1972.

    Awards

Bryan Washington has won the £30,000 Dylan Thomas Prize. 

Here’s the shortlist for the £10,000 Caine Prize. 

The NYPL has announced the 2020 Young Lions Fiction Award Finalists.

The National Book Foundation’s Innovations in Reading Prize goes to DIBS for Kids.

    Book Stuff

Inside the wild double life of rare books dealer John Jenkins

Legal Thrillers for Literary Snobs

Social isolation (and video chat) is bringing renewed attention to the art of the bookshelf

The Most Important (and Literary?) Meal of the Day 

Christie & Sayers & Allingham & Tey: Celebrating the Crime Queens of the Golden Age

The Cornerstones of Country Noir

Anything can be a Penguin Classic with this handy cover generator.


My First Thriller: Michael Connelly

Michael Connelly on ‘fake news,’ COVID-19 writing and his nonprofit-set thriller


How Novelist Megan Abbott Learned to Write for Television

Scott Turow on the One Character Who Keeps Coming Back to Him, Again and Again

Powell’s Books will be back, CEO Emily Powell pledges, but not soon

For Bookstore Owners, Reopening Holds Promise and Peril

For booksellers in L.A., a partial reopening brings hope and anxiety

Barnes & Noble is slowly reopening stores to shoppers in a few states.

‘Economic duress is nothing new’: Can America’s oldest black bookstore survive the pandemic?

Legendary Paris bookshop reveals reading habits of illustrious clientele

Research finds reading books has surged in the UK during lockdown

I wish more people would read … Damon Runyon’s short stories

Coronavirus Shutdowns Weigh on Book Sales 

Coronavirus forces National Book Festival to shift to online-only format this year

Martin Edwards on the Enduring Popularity of Traditional Mysteries 

25 GREAT INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORES IN THE U.S.

    Other Forms of Entertainment

Otto Penzler’s list of Greatest Crime Films of All-Time Continues

Michael Mann Is Talking to Directors, Wondering When They Can All Go Back to Work 

Before there was Jessica Fletcher, there were the Snoop Sisters.

Scrubs: A sitcom that’s actually aged well?

Hollywood’s Women in Criminal Justice: Sometimes Fact, Sometimes Fiction


Luca Guadagnino to remake Scarface with Coen brothers script

Scarface Hitman Geno Silva Dies of Dementia at 72


Die Hard With a Vengeance: The strange saga of Laurence Fishburne and how it ended up in court

“Hightown”: An Old-School Crime Drama That’s Thoroughly Modern 


Armed Guards and Death Threats: Inside the Making of Netflix’s Harrowing Jeffrey Epstein Documentary 

New book claims Bill Clinton had an affair with Ghislaine Maxwell

New Jeffrey Epstein doc should finally lead to a reckoning with Bill Clinton


    Words of the Month

contretemps (n): From the 1680s, “a blunder in fencing,” from French contre-temps “motion out of time, unfortunate accident, bad times” (16th C.), from contre, an occasional, obsolete variant of contra (prep.) “against” (from Latin contra “against;” see contra (prep., adv.)) + tempus “time” (see temporal). Meaning “an unfortunate accident, an unexpected or embarrassing event” is from 1802; as “a dispute, disagreement,” from 1961. It also was used as a ballet term (1706). [thanks to etymonline]

    RIP

May 10:Thomas Reppetto, Crime Watchdog and Historian, Is Dead at 88

May 12: Simon & Schuster President and CEO Carolyn Reidy Dies at 71

May 19: Leonard Levitt, Reporter Who Riled NYPD Brass, Dies at 79

May 28: Larry Kramer: Elton John leads tributes to playwright and Aids activist

    Author Events

nope, not yet…

    Links of Interest

May 2: Real-life Indiana Jones reveals £100million treasure trove dating back to 1200s

May 6: New Zealand coronavirus: Massive car heist under cover of lockdown

May 8: Authorities Recover 19,000 Artifacts in International Antiquities Trafficking Sting

May 11: Medieval Arrows Inflicted Injuries That Mirror Damage Caused by Modern Bullets

May 12: How It Felt Learning My Dad Is a Serial Killer

May 12: The Spy Who Handed America’s Nuclear Secrets to the Soviets

May 13: French serial-killer expert admits serial lies, including murder of imaginary wife

May 14: This AI-generated dictionary is very cool and also terrifying.

May 15: Why Do Some Writers Burn Their Work?

May 15: Lisa Scottoline’s daughter, Francesca Serritella, makes a name for herself as a novelist with ‘Ghosts of Harvard’

May 17: Dirty Harry’s blood-soaked San Francisco was a terrifying reality

May 17: Michael Jordan: NBA legend’s trainers sell for record $560,000

May 18: Text Found on Supposedly Blank Dead Sea Scroll Fragments

May 18: Sir Frederick Barclay’s nephew ‘caught with bugging device’ at Ritz hotel

May 18: Neil Gaiman spoken to by police after 11,000-mile trip

May 19: Do police sketches actually help catch criminals?

May 20: How to find a book without knowing the actual title

May 21: Bill Clinton and James Patterson reunite for a second thriller

May 21: A Crime Reader’s Guide to the Pope of Trash

May 21: Tony Hadley, a radio quiz, one syllable – and a $10,000 riddle

May 21: ‘I wrote my wife a poem every day for 25 years’

May 22: Loon stabs eagle through heart

May 22: Romance Writers of America aims for happy end to racism row with new prize

May 22: The Great Elmore Leonard Renaissance of the Late ‘90s

May 23: Berlin WW2 bombing survivor Saturn the alligator dies in Moscow Zoo

May 26: Canada tow-truck turf wars lead to nearly 200 charges

May 26: On Dracula‘s birthday, remember the copyright battle over the illegally-adapted Nosferatu.

May 26: ‘The Genetic Detective’ ~ CeCe Moore’s True Crime Career Started Out In An Unusual Way

May 27: About That Time Whitey Bulger “Won” the Mass Millions Lottery

May 27: What Do You Do With a Stolen van Gogh? This Thief Knows

May 27: Roman mosaic floor found under Italian vineyard

May 28: Sherlock Holmes and the Womanly Art of Self-Defense – Or, how to incorporate late 19th century suffragette self-defense movements into a Sherlock Holmes pastiche series.

    Words of the Month

melch (v.) to yield easily to pressure (thanks to Says You!, #522)

    What We’ve Been Up To

Amber

candyfinal

Guess What!!!! Season 2 of Finder of Lost Things is nearly ready to start posting! The story is finished and 2/3 of the photography is finished! So in the next couple of weeks it will go live!!! Woot!

IMG_5268

A Murderous Relation – Deanna Raybourn

Veronica Speedwell is back, and let me tell you, I’ve been looking forward to the next book in this series – and it didn’t let me down!

Though I must say when I read the flyleaf, I was a bit worried. As this story is set smack dab in Jack the Ripper’s reign of terror – and let me tell you everyone and their second cousin who writes historical mysteries in Victorian London eventually puts Whitechapel into their story…with varying degrees of success.

Happily, Raybourn has done a great job of incorporating the very well known string of murders in an intriguing way – while also skirting the specter that still haunts those cobblestone streets. By not only making sure we see the women as human beings (which often gets overlooked) but feel the fear that gripped London due to the London Police’ inability to apprehend him.

However, first and foremost, Veronica is asked by the royal family for help in making sure her half-brother and heir-to-the-throne doesn’t get caught in an indelicate position with someone who isn’t his future wife…Veronica initially says no…but then Lady Welly falls ill…and Veronica and Stoker decided to snoop around a bit.

And action, old enemies, and anarchy ensues.

I loved reading Rayborn’s mystery, writing, and flare from cover to cover! BTW – you don’t HAVE to read them in order…but if you read this one first, then go back and start with number one…well, you’ll have spoiled a portion of the tension in the earlier installments. So while you don’t have to read them in order – at this point I think you should! (You won’t be disappointed!)

Fran

So, isn’t 2020 a total pip? Something exciting around every corner, right?

Yeah, about that. So I decided to take a break from anything suspenseful, and on the recommendation of my favorite New Mexico hair stylist turned mask maker, I decided to read The Guinea Pig Diaries: My Life as an Experiment by A. J. Jacobs.

9781416599067Jacobs has found his niche in journalism and writing. He doesn’t just try new things, he immerses himself in them to see how they work. For example, one of his experiments is detailed in a book I have yet to read called “The Know-It-All”, where he reads every word of an encyclopedia. He also lived Biblically for a year. His wife is a saint.

In My Life as an Experiment, A. J. Jacobs has put together some of his smaller projects. For example, one chapter deals with unitasking – focusing solely on doing only one thing at a time. Literally just one thing. If you’re eating, don’t talk. No background noise, just eat.

Another deals with telling the absolute truth, no filters. He did this for a whole month. It’s amazing he has any friends left, and did I mention his wife is a saint?

What could be just stupid and mockable is the way A. J. Jacobs writes. He’s smart. He’s funny as hell. And he lists his sources and resources for things he does. He approaches each experiment with total concentration and absolute focus, true, but he never loses sight of himself, his wife and kids, and his sense of delight and enthusiasm. If it doesn’t interest him, he won’t do the experiment. It has to be meaningful and interesting and educational to him.

And it will be to you as well.

Now, what I didn’t realize when I started My Life as an Experiment, that at the back, before the source list and acknowledgments and whatnot, there’s another subsection for each chapter. He makes some observations about what he wrote, and some of the details that didn’t go into the flow of the narrative but are still fascinating. There are a couple of Appendices that are equally fascinating.

It’s not a mystery. It’s not true crime unless maybe one instance of identity theft. But it’s interesting and fun and humorous and exactly the change I needed right now. I think you’ll enjoy it too.

JB

Still reading and enjoying and amazed by John Connolly’s“The Sisters Strange”, his Charlie Parker novella being written and published as it is ready. At this writing, there are nearly 40 short chapters.  It’s a neat trick to pull off and a great story – as usual.

Not really sure how long I’ve been reading the Nate Heller books from Max Allan Collins. Maybe before SMB existed? They’re a terrific mix of true crime events and hardboiled fiction as Collins puts his private eye into historical cases and provides his solution to the events. In an early one, the determination isn’t that Zangara wasn’t trying to shoot FDR that day but intended to, and did, kill Chicago Mayor Cermak. The first few books deal mainly with the Chicago Mob and the hit was ordered by them for Cermak’s treachery.

The books deal with nearly all of the famous and lurid crimes and figures of the 20th C.: Bugsy Siegel, the Lindbergh Kidnapping, the Black Dahlia case, the Torso Murders in Cleveland, the disappearance of Earhart and the death of Forrestal, and, of course, JFK.

9780765378293The new book, Do No Harm, inserts Heller into the Marylin Shepard case and reunites the PI with a number of figures – Eliot Ness, F. Lee Bailey, Flo Kilgore (his stand in for journalist Dorothy Kilgallen) – and re-creates the case, the crimes, the trials, and the suspects. As usual, it’s great fun.

However, there’s one major problem with the story: on one hand, Sam Shepard is portrayed as a philandering rogue, on another as a man whose beautiful wife found sex painful and allowed what we’d now call an open marriage, and yet on a third hand, the victim is said to have been having a torrid affair with a neighbor. Well, which is it – she found sex painful or she was having a torrid affair with the mayor? Collins doesn’t resolve it, or, I suppose, leaves it unresolved as just another aspect of the case muddied by the different views of those involved.

At any rate, I look forward to Heller’s next case, whatever it may be. Not many more big cases for Heller to tackle, but then Collins is always full or surprises. I recommend the book AND the series!

9781501176890In The New Iberia Blues, Dave and Clete and Alafair continue their peculiar journey through live, with irritation and love, anger and confusion, dealing with the horrors we inflict upon one another, intentionally or not. Some horrors are minor while others scar the mind. And in this small corner of the world, we’re lucky we have these people to tackle the bad guys.

Burke’s writing skills haven’t lost a step. He knows where the world has been – literature, too – and isn’t hesitant to show the trail. “Every literary plot is either in the Bible, Greek mythology, or Elizabethan theater. Hemingway said it was all right for an author to steal as long as he improved the material… Read Charles Dickens’s journalistic account of a public execution in London. It will make you want to flee humanity”. Maybe so, but humanity also produces prose like that of James Lee Burke. So let’s stay a bit longer, huh?

 



BUY SMALL ~ SUPPORT SMALL




Author Recommendations – Additions to:

The Mysterious Bookshop in NYC has been posting lists of books recommended by Big Name (male) Authors. We’re passing them along. You can click on the links to order directly from the Mysterious Bookshop. If you’re interested in any title, please do order from a small independent bookseller!

Jonathan Santlofer recommends – – –

Andrew Gulli recommends – – –

Peter Robinson recommends – – –

Robert Goldsbourough – – – 

James Sallis recommends- – –

James Ellroy recommends – – –

James Grady recommends – – –

Author Recommendations (aka More Of)

The Mysterious Bookshop in NYC has been posting lists of books recommended by Big Name Authors. Thought we’d pass them along. You can click on the links to order directly from the Mysterious Bookshop. If you’re interested in any title, please do order from a small independent bookseller!

Martin Cruz Smith recommends – – –

Tasha Alexander recommends – – –

Wallace Stroby recommends – – –

A.J. Finn recommends – – –

Charles Ardai recommends – – –

Lorenzo Carcaterra recommends – –

Limited Edition Bibliomysteries!

From Otto Penzler – – –
              Most of you know that we have been publishing original bibliomysteries at the Mysterious Bookshop for several years. We publish them in paperback as well as in limited edition hardcovers, numbered or lettered and signed by the author.
                The publisher of Suntup Editions has selected six of these stories, those with a trace of supernatural elements, and published an extraordinary limited edition. The stories he selected were by Reed Farrel Coleman, John Connolly, Christopher Fowler, Elizabeth George, Anne Perry, and F. Paul Wilson. All copies are signed by all authors.
                Beautifully illustrated and hand-bound, Suntup Editions have become legendary collectors’ items.
                These books can be ordered only directly from the publisher—not from the Mysterious Bookshop. [see the link above – eds.]
                Fair warning: The books are expensive but they are exceptional books for serious collectors. The last two titles published by this press each sold out in about twenty minutes, so if you want one I suggest you order instantly!
                Please remember that you cannot order any copies from our store. Regrettably, we don’t have any and will not have any.
                Good luck and best wishes, Otto

READER_OK_02_FINAL

AUTHOR RECOMMENDATIONS – More!

The Mysterious Bookshop in NYC has been posting lists of books recommended by Big Name Authors. Thought we’d pass them along. You can click on the links to order directly from the Mysterious Bookshop. If you’re interested in any title, please do order from a small independent bookseller!

Max Allan Collins recommends – – –

Charles Todd recommends – – –

Louise Penny recommends – – –

George Easter recommends – – –

Ragnar Jonasson recommends – – –

Carolyn Hart recommends – – –

Reed Farrel Coleman recommends – – –

CJ Box recommends – – –

Anne Perry recommends – – –