December 2020

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Serious Stuff

‘Get the Hell Out of Here and Get Something to Shoot With’ The political machine in McMinn County, Tennessee, had spent Election Day intimidating voters, encouraging fraud and holding poll watchers at gunpoint. That’s when a group of World War II veterans decided to revolt.

The Unsettled Legacy of the Bloodiest Election in American History

A vaccine heist in 1959 set off a frantic search to recover the serum before it spoiled

University staff urge probe into e-book pricing ‘scandal’

Censorettes: The Women Wartime Censors Who Kept The Allies Safe And Uncovered A Nest of Spies in Brooklyn

What Ozark Gets Wrong: The Latest Tricks in International Money Laundering

Buying a baby on Nairobi’s black market

Read Walter Mosley’s Incredible Speech From Last Night’s National Book Awards

Why Writing About Cults—and People Who Join Them—Is Never Easy

Two Darwin Notebooks Quietly Went Missing 20 Years Ago. Were They Stolen?

Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster

On SPECTRE

Do you really want Amazon’s new drugstore knowing your medical condition?

Secret Amazon Reports Expose the Company’s Surveillance of Labor and Environmental Groups

“Amazon’s unchecked growth is a threat to everyone’s rights.”

Audible bows to pressure and changes returns policy

On Serial Killers and the Extremely Violent

‘They were not born evil’: inside a troubling film on why people kill

The psychiatrist, who is the subject of HBO’s new documentary Crazy Not Insane, tells us what she saw during her decades interviewing and assessing serial murders

Samuel Little, America’s Most Prolific Serial Killer, Confesses to Murder That Sent Innocent Man to Prison

Watch the Chilling Trailer For Netflix’s New True-Crime Docuseries, “The Ripper”

Art Crime

Amateur Art Sleuths Are Invited to Share Their Theories on the Whereabouts of Lost Art for a New Show About Missing Masterpieces

Inside Rome’s Secure Vault for Stolen Art

Art thriller ‘The Last Vermeer’ tells the engrossing true story of an ingenious fraud

The True Story of Rose Dugdale, The Woman Who Stole Vermeer

Want to own an art book on the Sistine Chapel? That’ll be $22,000—and you can’t return it.

Words of the Month

scruple (n.) A”moral misgiving, pang of conscience,” late 14th C., from Old French scrupule (14th C.), from Latin scrupulus “uneasiness, anxiety, pricking of conscience,” literally “small sharp stone,” diminutive of scrupus “sharp stone or pebble,” used figuratively by Cicero for a cause of uneasiness or anxiety, probably from the notion of having a pebble in one’s shoe. The word in the more literal Latin sense of “small unit of weight or measurement” is attested in English from late 14c. (etymonline)

Local Stuff

A Mysterious Pacific Northwest Road Trip

UNDETERMINED: A suspicious death at Green Lake, an investigation’s limits

Strange Stuff

The Most Unusual Murder Weapons in Crime Fiction

In the Footprints of the Hound: Why The Hound of the Baskervilles Still Haunts

‘Bullets for Dead Hoods’ salvages encyclopedia of 1930s mobsters

Powell’s by Powell’s fragrance offers smell of beloved Portland bookstore in one-ounce bottle

He Once Scouted Jamaican Beaches for Dr. No. Now, His 007 Rum Will Appear in No Time to Die.

Students discover hidden 15th-century text on medieval manuscripts

What Jack the Ripper’s Victims Can Teach Us About Digital Privacy

Words of the Month

As Donald Trump refuses to concede: the etymology of ‘coup’

Awards

Here are the winners of the 2020 World Fantasy Awards.

Douglas Stuart wins Booker prize for debut Shuggie Bain

Here are the winners of the 2020 National Book Awards.

Here is the shortlist for the 2020 Costa Book Awards.

Book Stuff

France’s independent bookshops struggle to survive a second lockdown

French bookworms denied their fix in lockdown

Want to Own a Beloved Book? Toni Morrison’s Book Collection Is for Sale

My First Thriller: Scott Turow

Vatican Library Enlists Artificial Intelligence to Protect Its Digitized Treasures

Review: Seven Kinds of People You Find in Bookshops by Shaun Bythell – virtuosic venting

A Collection of Rare Ian Fleming Books & Manuscripts Heads to Auction

Harlan Ellison’s The Last Dangerous Visions may finally be published, after five-decade wait

The Fleshly School: Sex writing in recent fiction

A comedian has just solved “the world’s most difficult literary puzzle.”

Beloved arts facility Poets House suspends operations

The Evolution of Espionage Fiction

A letter in which Beethoven literally just asks for some sheet music back has sold for $275k

The art of a short story

Unseen JRR Tolkien essays on Middle-earth coming in 2021

This museum is dedicated to the most famous Irish writers in history.  

Has Greed Fallen Behind as a Motive for Murder in Modern Crime Fiction?

Love and Murder with Jo Nesbø

The untold truth of the Hardy Boys

Arthur Conan Doyle and the Mutineers

Penguin Random House Staff Confront Publisher About New Jordan Peterson Book

‘Queen of crime’ Agatha Christie goes to Bollywood

Other Forms of Entertainment

How Sean Connery, an Unlikely Choice to Play Bond, Defined 007’s Style

15 Essential Conspiracy Theory Movies

Brooke Smith Answers Every Question We Have About The Silence of the Lambs

Val McDermid: The award-winning crime writer on how the plot of the novel that became ITV’s hit series Wire in the Blood arrived, fully formed, while she was driving on the M6

The secrets of TV’s greatest thriller-writer

This Week on Unlikeable Female Characters Podcast: Let’s Explore a Complicated Thriller Archetype: The Femme Fatale

This cryptic corner in downtown San Francisco is a movie treasure

C.J. Box on Big Sky, Big Twists, and Bringing a New Western Thriller to Montana

A forgotten female Sherlock Holmes gets her due in this audio play (with physical clues)

The Enduring Noir Legacy of John Cassavetes

31 Things We Learned from Michael Mann’s ‘Collateral’ Commentary

10 International True Crime Podcasts You Should Be Listening To Now

Misery at 30: a terrifying look at the toxicity of fandom

Out of the Shadows: Scoring ‘Double Indemnity’

‘Daredevil’ fans want Marvel to revive the show now that they have the rights again

‘Luther’ creator Neil Cross says there won’t be a season six but new project is coming soon

~ on The Godfather ~

Francis Ford Coppola announces new cut of ‘The Godfather III’

Oscar Isaac and Jake Gyllenhaal to star in ‘The Godfather’ making-of movie

Watch the dramatic trailer for Francis Ford Coppola’s new ‘Godfather III’ cut

Diane Keaton says watching recut ‘Godfather: Part III’ was “one of the best moments of my life”

Words of the Month

fustigate (v.)”to cudgel, to beat,” 1650s, back-formation from Fustication (1560s) or from Latin fusticatus, past participle of fusticare “to cudgel” (to death), from fustis “cudgel, club, staff, stick of wood,” of unknown origin. De Vaan writes that “The most obvious connection would be with Latin -futare” “to beat,” but there are evolutionary difficulties. (etymonline)

RIP

October 20: Jill Paton Walsh, writer of many genres, died at 84

November 6: Obituary: Geoffrey Palmer

November 8: Long-time customer Jim Mohundro died at 82

November 10: Scooby-Doo co-creator Ken Spears dies aged 82

November 29: Darth Vader actor Dave Prowse dies aged 85

Links of Interest

November 4: Inside the Early Days of The Crime of the Century

November 5: High Life: The Carnegie Deli Murders

November 9: Why the funniest books are also the most serious

November 10: Owners’ joy as rare £2.5m books stolen in London heist returned

November 12: The instrument that ‘aided espionage’

November 12: Newton’s Daunting Masterpiece Had a Surprisingly Wide Audience, Historians Find

November 12: 200 more copies of Newton’s ‘Principia’ masterpiece found in Europe by scholar sleuths

November 12: Cognitive Load Theory: Explaining our fight for focus

November 13: Yorkshire Ripper death: Force apology over victim descriptions

November 14: Egypt: More than 100 intact sarcophagi unearthed near Cairo

November 18: My Mother, The Mystery Writer

November 19: Theodore Roosevelt and The Frontier Lawman

November 20: War, heroism and sex: Pulp magazines & the messages they perpetuated

November 20: Berlin police hold ‘cannibal’ after bones found in park

November 22: Unknown Constables found hidden for 200 years in family scrapbook

November 22: Decades of Alan Rickman’s diaries will be published as a book in 2022.

November 24: Linda Millar’s brief life was full of tragedy. Her secrets found their way into novels thanks to her celebrated parents, Ross Macdonald and Margaret Millar. It’s time to see who she really was.

November 24: Metal monolith found by helicopter crew in Utah desert

Words of the Month

cantankerous (adj.) “marked by ill-tempered contradiction or opposition,” 1772, said by Grose to be “a Wiltshire word,” conjectured to be from an alteration (influenced perhaps by raucous) of a dialectal survival of Middle English contakour “troublemaker” (c. 1300), from Anglo-French contec “discord, strife,” from Old French contechier (Old North French contekier), from con- “with” + teche, related to atachier “hold fast” (see attach). With -ous. Related: Cantankerously; cantankerousness. (etymoline)

What We’ve Been Up To

Amber

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Still love Christie….I am still writing! So check out Finder of Lost Things!

I am presently killing my hands painting the interior of my husband and I’s new house…and have literally packed every single one of my books in preparation for moving (which is killing me as a bibliophile). So I haven’t had much spare time to read…I know excuses, excuses!

Fran

You’re going to get tired of hearing this.

I know, I know, but Louise Penny is great!

At least half of you are skipping this, aren’t you? Either you’ve already read it or you’re not a convert yet. Ha!

If you’ve never read Louise Penny, starting with her latest, ALL THE DEVILS ARE HERE, actually isn’t a bad place to begin. Granted, you won’t have the emotional ties that come with being in love with the series, but don’t worry. Once you’re hooked (and you will be), you’ll go back and start with STILL LIVES, and you’ll catch up.

ALL THE DEVILS ARE HERE takes place in Paris rather than Three Pines, which is part of what makes it okay to begin here. Also, you get a lot of family history, which will help you understand some of the cloudiness about Gamache’s relationship with his son, Daniel.

There is a lot going on in this book. Armand’s relationship with Daniel, Armand’s relationship with his godfather, Daniel’s relationship with Jean-Guy. And we spend a lot more time with Reine-Marie, which is lovely.

Oh, and there’s murder. And attempted murder, and theft and burglary and corporate shenanigans. Everything you expect from Louise Penny.

Now, let me be frank. This is not my favorite of her books. I think the ending was rushed, and I’m not entirely sure her new editor gets Louise’s vibe. At times it felt a little clunky.

That being said, I still skipped all my chores to race to the ending, which quite literally haunted my dreams. I woke up from a nightmare about being in the middle of the final conflict. She’s that good. So when I say it felt clunky, understand that it’s still much, much better than many other authors’ work! It just felt rushed.

So there you go, yet another endorsement for Louise Penny, and yes, you absolutely should read ALL THE DEVILS ARE HERE. And don’t worry, you’ll still be in touch with the Three Pines crew. I think you’re gonna love the ending, by the way. *wink*

Now I want a Parisian pastry.

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Seattle Mystery Bookshop

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